HEADING SOUTH TO VICTORIA

This morning Ngozi departed Truce on her way back to New Zealand.  The Harbourmaster at Hoonah very generously gave her a lift up to the airport.  I am now alone again and have missed having company today.  And no, it’s not just to have help with the cooking and cleaning!

The voyage from Canoe Cove to Glacier Bay has been a great experience for me.  I have experienced rain, cold, headwinds, glorious days, calm nights, wildlife, interesting people and made new friends along the way.  Truce has proved to be a wonderful little boat, well built, comfortable, capable of looking after me and tolerating my mistakes.  The next voyage to the south will mean a bit of backtracking but I will try and avoid visiting previous stops.

I was a bit lazy this morning, probably a bit flat after Ngozi departing.  Eventually I managed to get off the dock and headed out into Icy Strait, still not sure what route to take south, only knowing I was heading east first.  Once I got into the Strait a westerly breeze picked up and I set all sail, so relaxing to be sailing and switch the motor off.  At the east end of Icy Strait, the wind shifted to the south, blowing up Clarence Strait.  My route was now decided, I was not going down Clarence Strait, I sailed up Lynn Canal with a good following breeze.  I will now head down Stephens Passage, into Frederick Sound and Wrangell Narrows.  This is all new territory for me.

The weather was very warm today with clear visibility.  I was sailing in just a pair of shorts in brilliant sunshine, sparking seas with vistas of snow-capped mountains and glaciers.  Magical.  There was a lot of boat traffic about today, fishing boats, sports boats, tourist boats, the most I have seen in Alaska.  Auke seems to be the centre for boating out of Juneau.

After sailing for seven hours today, mostly not too fast, I have anchored in Auke Bay for the evening.  In the anchorage there is another yacht, a French yacht also heading south.  The anchorage is a bit bumpy due to all the boat traffic passing by at high speed, also a bit noisy with 3 jet skis buzzing around and music coming from the shore.  This place looks like a holiday destination with nice homes doted along the shore line.  Total voyage distance 41.4 miles.

SIDE TRIP TO NOWHERE

This morning opened wet and misty, a constant wet drizzle and visibility reduced to about half a mile.  I decided to take a side trip up Dundas Sound to the West Arm where there should be a good anchorage and some great views of the mountains beyond.

After a short motor in calm conditions I anchored in the west arm and awaited for the weather to improve.  Unfortunately, by early afternoon there was no change, there was nothing to be seen, only mist and the shore up to around 300 feet.  So, being impatient and wanting to do something I decided to head back to my anchorage from the previous nigh which is more sheltered.

In the West Arm I saw an amazing sight.  A large group of Sea Otters all bunched together lying around on the surface.  There must have been at least forty of them.  The food must be abundant around here to support so many otters.

It was Salmon again for lunch and dinner, now it’s finished.  That’s good, I need a change from a Salmon diet.  Total voyage distance 1,375.4 miles.

Logged 3rd July 2016

VIEW OF BRADY GLACIER

Mark popped on board this morning with a present of four thick King Salmon steaks bagged in ice.  Fresh wild Salmon is a real delight, no comparison to the stuff from the supermarket.

It rained all night but cleared up in the morning.  I sailed at eleven across Cross Strait to Fern Harbour.  The harbour provides a magnificent view of the tail end of Brady Glacier and awesome high mountains beyond.  Luckily the cloud cleared and the sun came out and it got quite warm.

Unfortunately, Fern Harbour proved no too good as an overnight anchorage.  Firstly, there is a swell that enters the bay, secondly the bottom is very rocky and the anchor chain jumps across the rocks and finally the place is infested with hundreds of horse flies, or deer flies.

Whatever they are called, they are quite large, bite and make noise.  Quite unbearable, so I had to depart after a couple of hours and moved around to Dundas Bay.  I am told that Dundas Bay is part of the Glacier Bay National Park (its next door) but a permit is not required for this side.

It’s a pretty remote and wild place and I hope to explore further into the arms of the bay tomorrow. Looks like Salmon again for dinner tonight.

Total voyage distance 1,361.4 miles.

Logged 2nd July 2016