CONGRATULATIONS TEAM NEW ZEALAND

Well I did jinx my good fortune.  At daybreak this morning the wind went AWOL.  We have been left floundering around, sails slating, constantly trimming trying to get some motion in the right direction.  I should know better – when things are going well – keep quiet about it!

Congratulations Team New Zealand
Congratulations Team New Zealand

The Meteorologist in Hawaii said this unusual weather event will be finished tomorrow and the normal trade winds will set in again.  So, nothing for me to do.  Just sit tight and wait for wind sixty miles offshore Hawaii.  It doesn’t really matter when we arrive but I have an itch to get ashore and explore, rolling around out here is not good for crew morale.

I gave Hilo Port a call and let them know I was coming in.  They were friendly and said either anchor in the port or find a berth, then check with security what to do.  All very casual, sounds good.  They just want me to keep clear of a Holland America cruise ship they have arriving at seven thirty.

This morning I received the news that Team New Zealand had won the Americas Cup in Bermuda.  This news has made my day.  What a fantastic achievement.  All the other Oracle tag along contenders didn’t stand a chance, it was always NZ, the black boat, that was the boat to beat.  There is a lot of high tech, money, egos and prestige associated with the Americas Cup and for New Zealand to win is spectacular.  As for the Aussie Skipper, little Jimmy – make him eat Marmite!  I look forward to catching up the action replays later.  I suppose NZ will be in party mood today.  Voyage distance 2,036 miles.

STILL ON EASY STREET TO HILO

I don’t want to jinx my good fortune but we are still running with Jib poled out to port directly down the track to Hilo.  If the wind holds true we will be arriving early on Tuesday morning.

This morning I turned again to bread making.  I used a new method I thought up that’s easier when we are rocking and rolling at sea.  Turned out wonderful, nice fluffy bread with a crisp crust.  The galley gets pretty hot with the oven on, not a place to hang around in.

I had the first sign of outside human life for over week this morning.  On the VHF radio channel 16 part of a broadcast from US Coastguard in Honolulu came in.  Must be a rebroadcast from Hawaii I guess.  There are a few more seabirds around today but still no other ships to be seen, either visually or on AIS.

I checked out the local VHF radio and AM radio but stations coming in yet.  Maybe later I will pick up something after sunset.   Everybody on board Truce is willing Team NZ on in the Americas Cup, I would love to wake up and hear the news we had won on the radio from Hawaii.

When searching around for food at lunchtime I came across a tin of spam.  It looked alluring at me from the corner of the cupboard – it was saying ‘go on you know you want me’.  Yes! I want you and am going to have you I thought.  As soon as I stripped off the top of the tin I knew I had fallen into the spam trap again.  The sickening pale pink colour and the slight whiff of Pedigree Chum dog food reaffirmed my mistake.  I will split it 50:50 with the fishes.  Voyage distance 1,929 miles.

SAILING INTO THE TROPIC OF CANCER

Looking at the log book for last night I see I was having a hard time.  Sails up and down, in and out, tacking, gybing and engine on.  Sometimes reducing sail as going too fast and others just no wind.  I was surprised to find we had covered 109 miles noon to noon, a commendable effort in such trying conditions.  It must be good for you, good exercise in the fresh air.

Since midday it has been easy street.  Sailing with just the jib poled out to port, making a steady five plus knots in sparkling weather directly towards our destination.  Also, an opportunity to catch up on some sleep from the night before.

Waikiki beach, Hawaii. Photo Ngozi Penson
Waikiki beach, Hawaii. Photo Ngozi Penson

Today we crossed the imaginary line into the Tropic of Cancer.  This line marks the furthest point north the sun will get before heading back to the south again.  If you stood on the line at midday of the summer solstice the sun would be directly overhead at noon.  The word tropic is derived from a Greek word meaning to turn (that’s what we learned in navigation).

The Greeks were quite good at maths and figuring out what the planets were doing.  The ancient Brits were also up to speed on all that stuff – just that being illiterate they couldn’t write it down – they had to explain it in big stone circles

This time last year Truce and I were in Sitka Alaska.  Sitka was a really nice place, one of the best towns in Alaska.  What a contrast sailing into Hawaii.  I am getting quite excited by it all now and really looking forward to getting ashore in Hilo, only three more days to go.

A small rum and coke will be appropriate for sundowners today, we are in the tropics after all.  Voyage distance 1,816 miles.